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Kotzur Bike 2: Much Better!

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kotzur bike 2
The wonder-machine
Once I was established back in Sydney in 2001 I was building bikes, but I also wanted to revisit the idea of a " proper" bike from Wayne Kotzur. I developed a comprehensive plan with pictures and features galore. The picture above shows most of it.
Ready for touring
Ready for touring
Loaded up in Auckland it worked quite well, albeit a little light on the front wheel because I had no weight under the bike.
Drivers eye view
Drivers eye view
The second photo is round the waterfront in Nelson, where there's now cycle lanes. At last! For the NZ tour I threw together some ASS handlebars of my own design, as Wayne supplies a set of adjustable ones that didn't look too good for three weeks of touring.
back end detail
back end detail
The rear wheel looks a little busy: there's the rack loops, holding panniers out of the rear wheel, then the disk brakes, then the Rohloff hub. Also the suspension, and the giant rear light. But it all works. The only real problem was oil leaking out of the Rohloff and onto the disk. Not sure how to fix that, but I'm trying to get new seals from Rohloff (which the IHPVA lists assure me might work).
front end detail
front end detail
At the front it all looks much simpler. The Ballistic fork is apparently a cheapy, but it's also the only 20" one they make. It's currently being replaced with a Cannondale Headshock, as the backs of my knees hit the top of the fork when I try to straighten them. This makes riding unnecessarily hard, IMO. Evan has one of these now and loves it. Note the unused speedo mount, since the speedo I found lying round fitted onto the main tube.
handlebars and seat
handlebars and seat
The handlebars also get a bit busy, but it's very easy to operate - twist gear shifter to get a better gear, since the 14 available are in a nice order and spacing ;-). Likewise, twin Hayes disks mean gentle braking is all that's required. The long bar gives a bit of tiller effect, but that also makes it more controllable at higher speeds. You can see Wayne's "flexibar" strapped under the seat (I took it to NZ just in case my quick bar failed or wasn't as good as I hoped).
front view
front view
It's fairly narrow, slightly narrower than me, which is what really counts. With the tent and sleeping mat under the seat they poke out a little each side but don't seem to hurt the aerodynamics too much.
rear view
rear view
The rear rack pokes out a little more at the bottom than I really like, but the nice men on the train to Murwillumbah bent the left side in, and also flattened the seat a little. I suspect the bike box was on the bottom of a pile or something. I may work on that when I get it back from Wayne.
in use
in use
Around town the bike works pretty well, the rack will easily take two front panniers and it's manoeuvrable enough in traffic. Big plus for me is that it will go on the trains in NSW, so it makes a great vehicle for most of the longer rides I do with other people, as we usually take the train out to somewhere, ride, then return. Otherwise it's a 100km round trip just to see the countryside in most directions.
folded up
folded up
I also discovered that it takes less than five minutes with a 5/6mm allen key and a small spanner to put it in the back of a small hatchback. I can unscrew the rear elastomer just by twisting it, which folds the back wheel under, the boom comes off and suddenly the bike is quite short. Taking the seat and handlebars off is easy enough, at which point the fork pulls out and the total package goes into a boot space about 110cm x 70cm x 50cm high, with a bit of room left for other stuff. There's two bolts on the handlebars, four on the seat, and on the reaction arm for the Rohloff, plus the elastomer. The guy who offered me a lift home "if I could get my bike in his boot" must have thought he was pretty safe, right up until he saw me take the seat off ;-)
moz sitting on his Kotzur recumbent bike
ready to go
Sitting on my bike.